GIS Day, 2013 – Discovering the World Through GIS

GIS Day is a global event that celebrates the real-world benefits of geographic information systems (GIS) – the use and analysis of mapping technology for decision-making and data visualisation. Individuals, businesses, governments, charities…everyone can benefit from GIS. GIS Day provides an international forum for users of geographic information systems (GIS) technology to demonstrate real-world applications that are making a difference in our society. Organizations all over the world that use GIS, or are interested in GIS, participate by holding or sponsoring an event of their own. In 2005 more than 700 GIS Day events were held in 74 countries around the globe.  The first formal GIS Day took place in 1999. Esri president and co-founder Jack Dangermond credits Ralph Nader with being the person who inspired the creation of GIS Day. He considered GIS Day a good initiative for people to learn about geography and the uses of GIS. He wanted GIS Day to be a grassroots effort and open to everyone to participate.

GIS Day is held the third Wednesday of November each year, during Geography Awareness Week, a geographic literacy initiative sponsored by the National Geographic Society.

GIS Day is One Fun Day to

  • Celebrate GIS with everyone
  • Discover and explore the benefits of GIS
  • Showcase the uses of GIS
  • Build and nurture your GIS community

Future Dates

  • 2013 – Wednesday, November 20, 2013
  • 2014 – Wednesday, November 19, 2014
  • 2015 – Wednesday, November 18, 2015
  • 2016 – Wednesday, November 16, 2016
  • 2017 – Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Find the GIS Day Events Around the Globe

GISday Map – an Instagram Experiment

Something The Entire World Should See

North East of Hawaii, the ocean currents form a giant whirl pool of debris from around the Pacific, the scientific name is called the North Pacific Gyre. It’s one of the largest ecosystems on Earth, comprising of millions of square kilometres. Today it’s better known as “The Great Garbage Patch,” an area the size of Queensland, Australia where there is approximately one million tonnes of plastic spread  throughout the ocean. Drag a net in any area of this part of the ocean and you will pick up toxic, discarded plastic. Photographer Chris Jordan has documented this phenomenon.

 

The desire to change these things will put the human race on a journey to do so, and we are in the midst of it.